Can I be a wildlife rehabilitator?

People often ask “Can I be a wildlife rehabilitator?” The short answer is “Yes, with some hard work”. There is a very specific process to become a wildlife rehabilitator in Massachusetts. Most interested people first take a course on rehabilitation that usually is...

Nuisance wildlife?

Nuisance wildlife is a term I rarely use, but hear almost on a daily basis from callers in the community.  The definition of nuisance wildlife is any animal that interferes with other human activities or that is menacing, or destructive.  There are the...

Top 10 questions asked on the wildlife hotline

Photo: Julian Hochgesang via Unsplash At the New England Wildlife Centers located in Barnstable and South Weymouth, we answer wildlife calls from the public seven days a week.  We answer approximately 15,000 wildlife calls a year.  These lines are answered...

Cooperation between wildlife agencies

Managing the health and well-being of injured, orphaned or abandoned wildlife takes a lot of individuals working with different agencies throughout Massachusetts.  The Cape Wildlife Center works with licensed wildlife rehabilitators in the community, other...

Heartworm in wildlife

I’ve been a dog owner all my life and I am familiar with canine heartworm and the need for prevention.  All my dogs are on monthly heartworm preventative and get tested yearly.  Still, I was extremely surprised when a coyote that came into the Cape Wildlife...

Living peacefully with coyotes

People can live among coyotes and never see them.  Coyotes have been interacting with and adapting to people for the last 100 years.  Coyotes are curious and smart, and urban areas can provide the perfect balance of food, shelter and water for them to...

When people stay in, wildlife comes out!

Sir Isaac Newton stated “Every action has an equal and opposite reaction”. That is proving to be true as we quarantine during this Covid-19 pandemic.  As more people are staying indoors, more animals are filling up the spaces that are now vacant.  They have...

The cost of caring

When your pets get sick, you bring them to your veterinarian to be treated. Your pets fortunately have you to provide financial and medical support. When wildlife gets orphaned, sick or injured, whose responsibility is it to get it medical care and to pay for it? All...

Through the eyes of a squirrel

Although we normally don’t attribute human qualities to wildlife at the Cape Wildlife Center, by observing the animals we do believe they experience feelings. Squirrels appear to show happiness, curiosity, frustration, anger and fear.  Try to imagine what an...

Understanding the Migratory Bird Treaty Act

The National Audubon Society’s first major accomplishment in protecting birds, was the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) that was signed into law in 1918.  For the past 100 years this act has saved millions, if not billions of birds.  Still, most people don’t...